Which hygienic protection should you choose?


Which hygienic protection should you use: tampon, towel, menstrual cup, panty liner or absorbent panties? Choosing the best period protection for you, according to your age, flow, the time of day, any sensitivity you may have, etc.

Which hygienic protection should you choose? Here are the specificities and advantages of each form of hygienic protection available on the market so you can choose the right one.

 

Sanitary towels 

This is the fundamental period protection product, used by all girls starting their periods for the first time, before they ultimately turn to other solutions. Sanitary towels are easy to use and do not require anything to be inserted into the vagina.

 

Tampons

Tampons are practical and discreet – a revolution in women’s lives! This small cylinder of white fabric is inserted into the vagina to absorb the blood flow. As with sanitary towels, this period protection should be changed regularly, a maximum of every 4 to 6 hours, or more often in the case of a very heavy flow. It is important to wash your hands before and after handling a tampon. The media coverage of Toxic Shock Syndrome, sometimes linked to the improper use of tampons, has sown doubt among fans of this form of protection. Rest assured that such cases are extremely rare, and using tampons properly, following the rules of use, helps to prevent it.

Here are a few tips and rules to follow:

  • Do not wear your tampon for longer than 6 hours
  • Do not wear a tampon while sleeping
  • Do not flush down the toilet

 

Panty liners

Slim and discreet, the panty liners are a form of period protection that can be used in a range of circumstances: at the start of your period, to absorb any minor bleeding, during your period in addition to a tampon, at the end of your cycle, for a light flow, etc. You can also wear a panty liner to protect your underwear in the event of unusual discharge.

 

Cup or menstrual cup

This hygienic protection is an alternative to tampons. It comes in the form of a cup made from biomedical-grade silicone, which is inserted into the vagina to collect menstrual blood. It comes in several sizes according to blood flow or the width of the vagina. It is very economical, lasting an average of 5 years. Choose one that is phtalate- and Bisphenol A-free. The cup should be emptied regularly (a maximum of every 4 to 6 hours) and rinsed before being re-inserted. It is also important to wash your hands before and after use. Inserting and removing it does require a little bit of practice.

Toxic Shock Syndrome can be linked to improper use of the cup. Such cases are extremely rare, and using tampons properly, following the rules of use, helps to prevent it.

Here are a few tips and rules to follow: 

  • Do not wear a menstrual cup for longer than 6 hours
  • Do not wear a cup while sleeping
  • Sterilise the cup before use

Juliane BERDAH

Medical and obstetric Gynaecologist

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